Archive | June, 2017

Celebrate National Safety Month This June

5 Jun
Join the National Safety Council (NSC) and thousands of organizations across the country as we work to raise awareness of what it takes to Keep Each Other Safe. Observed annually in June, National Safety Month focuses on reducing leading causes of injury and death at work, on the road and in our homes and communities.

Week 1: Stand Up to Falls

Home is the place where we feel most safe, so it may come as a surprise to hear that falls in the home are one of the leading causes of injury-related death in the U.S., second only to poisoning. Falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries, including concussions.

Eliminating tripping hazards
Prevent falls at home—and at work—by removing the sources of tripping:
  • Secure electrical and phone cords away from walking areas, such as hallways or in front of your desk
  • Use non-skid rugs and be sure to tape them down to prevent rolling
  • Keep drawers and cabinets closed when you’re not using them
  • Wear proper footwear, paying special attention to outdoor conditions
  • Clean up any spills immediately and include warning signage if necessary
  • Refrain from walking while distracted – stay focused on your surroundings
  • Ensure there is adequate lighting in your workspace
  • Don’t carry more than you can handle—large loads can obstruct your vision and affect your balance
Preventing falls in your bathroom
Falls can happen anywhere, but in your home, the bathroom is one of the most dangerous places. According to the CDC, about 235,000 people over age 15 visit the emergency room each year due to a bathroom related-injury. Older adults are especially susceptible. According to the National Institute on Aging, 80 percent of senior falls happen in the bathroom due to slippery floors and surfaces.
Keep loved ones of every age safe:
  • Place a non-slip mat both inside and outside of the tub
  • Plug in nightlights in and around the bathroom for increased visibility
  • Clean up any condensation or puddles on the  oor
  • Place non-slip decals on the bottom of your shower or tub
  • Keep shampoo, soap and other bath products higher up to avoid bending
  • Install grab bars by the toilet and in or near the shower and tub to assist older adults
  • Make sure the bathroom door swings outward in case of a fall
Make your home safer by starting at the source. Remove tripping hazards around your home and ensure your bathroom is slip-free to eliminate the risk of falling.

Week 2: Recharge to Be in Charge (Focusing on Fatigue)

Like many Americans, you might feel that you’re not getting enough sleep. The CDC reports that 1 in 3 adults don’t get enough sleep. It is also estimated that 37 percent of the U.S. workforce is sleep deprived. We need proper sleep to recharge our stamina, face the day and avoid injuries at home and at work.

Getting good sleep
To be alert, well-rested and at your best, follow these tips:
  • Get 7-9 hours of sleep every day
  • Create and follow a sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day—even on weekends.
  • Eliminate unnecessary light
  • Keep your bedroom temperate – neither hot nor cold
  • Make sure your bed and pillows are comfortable and support restful sleep
  • Avoid eating right before bed
  • Remember that bedtime is for sleeping, not reading or watching TV
  • Avoid using electronic devices before bed which can inhibit sleep
Dangers of Sleep Deprivation
We all have busy lives and sleep is often the first thing many of us cut back on to accommodate our schedules. In the long run, this can be dangerous. Sleep deprivation has been shown to raise the risks of depression, obesity and heart disease, and has an adverse effect on reproductive health. Lack of sleep can also lead you to experience short bursts of sleep lasting anywhere from a fraction of a second or up to 30 seconds, known as microsleep. Individuals who experience microsleep lose awareness and consciousness during the episode, which can be dangerous especially on the road.
  • Plan to take regular rest breaks and rotate drivers when travelling long distances
  • Avoid alcohol and medications that may make you drowsy while driving
  • If you feel drowsy, pull over when it is safe to do so
  • To combat drowsiness, have a cup of coffee or caffeinated drink and stretch your legs by taking a short walk
  • If you need more rest, take a quick nap if it is safe to do so
  • If you are too tired to continue driving even a er a break, don’t drive. Stay at a hotel or call someone—a loved one, friend or even a cab or ride-sharing service—to get you to your destination safely
Don’t get sidelined by fatigue. Get plenty of sleep to recharge and stay healthy and avoid dangerous situations like driving when drowsy.

Week 3: Prepare for Active Shooters

Preparing for the worst can be difficult. Nobody wants to think about being involved in a situation with an active shooter – they can be unpredictable and unfold quickly. Because an active shooter behaves erratically, they have no pattern and their victims are random—being prepared can be your best defense.

Responding to an active shooter situation
Active shooters can appear in public places such as movie theaters and shopping malls or in private workplaces. No matter where you are, remain as calm as possible and remember:
  • Be aware of any possible danger in your environment
  • Identify the two nearest exits
  • If you can flee, do so immediately—leave belongings behind
  • If you cannot flee, hide in an area where the shooter can’t see you
  • If you are behind a door, try to lock or block entry to it
  • Silence electronic devices
  • As a last resort, try to incapacitate the shooter. Keep moving and be distracting. In close range situations,  fighting increases your chance of survival.
  • Call 911 as soon as you can do so safely
Wait for law enforcement to arrive
Law enforcement will usually be required to end the situation. Comply with law enforcement and allow them to resolve the situation as quickly as possible.
There are several ways you can assist:
  • To the best of your ability, be prepared to provide 911 and law enforcement with your location, the number of shooters, physical description of the shooter(s), the number and type of weapons used by the shooter(s) and the number of potential victims
  • When law enforcement arrives, remain calm and follow all instructions
  • Don’t scream or yell
  • Keep your hands raised, visible and free of any objects
  • Evacuate the area quickly—do not stop law enforcement to ask questions or for help
Facing an active shooter can be unimaginable, but being prepared might save your life. Remember to stay alert and as calm as possible. Try to run first, hide if you cannot flee safely and fight only when you have no other choice.

Week 4: Don’t Just Sit There (Focusing on Ergonomics)

If you have back pain, you’re not alone. About 80% of the U.S. population will experience back pain issues at some point in their lives, and 31 million will experience low-back pain at any given time. Most of these cases are not caused by serious underlying conditions, but from actions like improper lifting technique.

Lift safely
Prevent strains, dislocations and muscle tears. When lifting, make sure you:
  • Stretch and warm up before you perform any lifting
  • Keep your back straight and bend your knees – remember to never twist or bend your back
  • Are on solid ground with your feet shoulder-width apart
  • Keep the box or object close to your body
  • Lift with your legs, not your back
  • Limit the amount of weight you carry – separate boxes or make two trips instead of carrying more than you can handle
  • Ask for help to carry heavy, bulky or large loads
  • Keep pathways clear of tripping hazards
Ergonomics for the home office worker
Telecommuting is an increasingly popular option to help employees maintain a better work-life balance. Convenience and flexibility are great, but don’t leave ergonomics at the office.
Make sure:
  • Chairs have proper lumbar and arm support, and can be adjusted for height
  • Feet are flat on the ground or a footrest
  • The viewing distance from your eyes to the monitor is at least 18 inches
  • Your keyboard and mouse are at approximately elbow height
  • Lighting is sufficient enough that you don’t have to strain, but not too bright where glare is an issue
  • To take short breaks. Look away from your screen every 15 minutes, take microbreaks in between bursts of heavy typing and don’t forget to take a rest break every 30 or 60 minutes. Get out of your chair, stretch and move around.
By making ergonomics part of your routine at work and at home, you can keep your body free of strain and pain.

The mission of the National Safety Council is to eliminate preventable deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. Join us as we help #KeepEachOtherSafe this June and throughout the year. For any questions regarding workplace safety, contact us at Don Dressler Consulting and CalWorkSafety.com today!
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