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CA Minimum Wage Hikes Begin July 1st

25 Jun
June-Wages Up
Employers’ Posters Must Conform With July 1, 2019 Minimum Wage Rate Increases

California local cities and counties continue to pass minimum wage ordinances and other employment laws relating to paid sick leave and criminal background checks. On July 1, 2019, several local minimum wage rates also increase, as will two new local minimum wage ordinances will be required.

City & County Minimum Wage Increases Start July 1st
  • Berkeley: $15.59/hour.
  • Emeryville: $16.30/hour for businesses of all sizes (except for Small Independent Restaurants).
  • City of Los Angeles: $14.25/hour for employers with 26+ employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • County of Los Angeles (unincorporated areas only): $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • Malibu: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • Milpitas: $15/hour.
  • Pasadena: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • San Francisco: $15.59/hour.
  • San Leandro: $15/hour.
  • Santa Monica: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
    Note: Eligibility rules may vary based on different locations.
Two New Minimum Wage Ordinances Start July 1st
  • Alameda: $13.50/hour.
  • Fremont: $13.50/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; employers with 25 or fewer employees will continue to pay the state minimum wage rate until July 1, 2020.

Employees classified under the executive, administrative or professional exemptions must earn a minimum monthly salary of no less than two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment. For employers with 26+ employees, the required monthly salary is $4,160 per month, and employers with less than 25 employees, the required monthly salary is $3,813.33 per month.

The exempt salary test is based on the California minimum wage; it increases every year on January 1 as the state minimum wage increases (the salary test is not affected, however, by any applicable local minimum wage.) The exempt salary test is calculated using the current California minimum wage, even if an employer’s nonexempt employees are entitled to receive a higher minimum wage under a local ordinance.

Raise for Nonexempt Employees
If you have nonexempt employees working in any of the following localities, the required local hourly minimum wage will increase on July 1, 2019 as follows:

Northern California

  • Alameda: $13.50.
  • Berkeley: $15.59.
  • Emeryville: $15 for “small independent restaurants”; $16.30 for all other employers.
  • Fremont: $13.50 for employers with 26+ employees; 25 or less employees subject to California minimum wage).
  • Milpitas: $15.
  • San Francisco: $15.59.
  • San Leandro: $14.
  • Southern California
    City of Los Angeles, County of Los Angeles (unincorporated areas only), Malibu, Pasadena, and Santa Monica: $14.25 for employers with 26+ employees; and $13.25 for less than 25 employees.

    Updated Minimum Wage Increase Workplace Posters Required for
    LA, San Francisco & Santa Monica – Increases in the Local Minimum Wage

    In May 2019, the Los Angeles Office of Wage Standards Ordinance updated the city’s minimum wage notice to reflect the increases that are effective July 1, 2019 as follows: $13.25 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees; and $14.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees. This notice must be conspicuously posted in any workplace or job site. Violators are subject to penalties. See the Notice

    Beginning July 1, 2019, the San Francisco Office of Labor Standards Enforcement updated its San Francisco minimum wage notice to reflect the city and county’s minimum wage increase to $15.59 per hour. This notice must be posted in the workplace where employees can easily read it. Failure to post this notice may result in penalties. See the Notice

    In April 2019, the City of Santa Monica updated mandatory workplace posters to reflect the following wage increases effective July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020. The City of Santa Monica minimum wages increase to $13.25/hour for small businesses, and $14.25/hour for large businesses. Hotel worker living wage increases to $16.63/hour. Also City’s paid sick leave notice and service charge law notice. Failure to post these notices subjects employers to penalties. See the Packet

    The CalWorkSafety Consultants Are Here to Help Clients
    With all Questions or Concerns About These New Notices.
    Contact Us to Help You Sort Out Your Options

    FTC and EEOC Agree on Background Check Guidelines

    1 Apr

    On March 10, 2014, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) jointly issued two short guides on the use of background checks in hiring and personnel decisions.

    Generally speaking, these guides do not break new ground, but serve more as reminders to employers of their existing obligations under federal law when inquiring into or otherwise considering an applicant’s or employee’s background information. I have attached information about these new guides for you.

    If you have questions about procedures for hiring new employees or “on-boarding” (the important first weeks of getting new employees established as productive members of your team), let me know and our team of human resources professionals can assist you

    Don Dressler. Consultant and Attorney at Law
    Ph: 949-533-3742 – websites: http://www.dondressler.com” and http://www.calworksafety.com

    Pre-Employment Background Checks and Safety

    14 Jul

    Does your company conduct background checks on candidates you are considering to add as new employees? Have you considered the safety reasons to do so?

    At a time when the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has recently issued “Enforcement Guidelines for Arrest and Conviction Records in Employment”, many employers are rethinking the use of criminal background checks as part of their hiring process. Continue reading