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Is Your Company Prepared for These 10 Questions in 2019?

9 Oct

BottomLine Oct Update

  1. How will your firm incorporate the new or changed laws into policies and procedures?
  2. What adjustments have you made regarding 1099 changes (rules for independent contractors)?
  3. Do you have an arbitration agreement to avoid court lawsuits involving employees?
  4. Does your company have a safety plan?
  5. Is your sexual harassment policy training completed yet?
  6. How have you prepared to objectively investigate a harassment claim?
  7. What’s your plan to train each of your employees on harassment and workplace bullying prevention? How to deal with violence in the workplace?
  8. How are you calculating pay, bonuses, missed breaks, missed meals, and overtime? (are you using “rounding” for recording time?)
  9. What expectations have been set for the most critical jobs in your organization?
  10. Is your New Hire and Termination process current?
If your answers to these questions is marginal, what’s your plan for 2019?
CalWorkSafety is a leader in labor law, risk management and consultant on: Human Resources,Safety & Cal/OSHA, Labor Law/Discrimination/EOP and Workers’ Compensation. Through the design of customized HR packages, Cal Work Safety significantly reduces worker’s compensation costs and protects employers from non-compliance issues … while providing effective employee training solutions to southern California companies.
The Bottom Line:
Our Virtual HR Department offers effective hands-on Management and Staff training dealing with Mandated Regulations.  By simplifying the
employee relations and compliance elements we help clients reduce
workers’ compensation premiums, prevent discrimination and harassment claims, and settle/avoid employee claims. To learn more about preparing for 2019 HR compliance, call us at 949-533-3742 or email:

Visit our website:

or Call:  949-533-3742
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Summer Is Here…And It’s Hot!

15 Aug

With the heat of summer in full swing, California employers covered by CA Regulations  Code, (Title 8, Section 3395) who have employees who work outdoors should review their practices to ensure that they are complying with current Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention requirements.

With the High Heat conditions we are experiencing now, Cal/OSHA will be Watching and Inspecting employers to ensure that they follow this heat-related regulations:

  • Free, Cool Water
  • Access to Shade
  • High-Heat Procedures (written)
  • Training for Employees (documented)
  • Emergency Response Procedures (written)
  • Acclimatization
  • Heat Illness Prevention Plan (written)

If you have not already done so, every California employer should develop and implement an effective Heat Illness Prevention Plan for their employees, including:

  1. Procedures for providing sufficient water
  2. Procedures for providing access to shade
  3. High-heat procedures
  4. Emergency response procedures
  5. Acclimatization methods and procedures

These regulations are for the employer’s protection and employees.  

Enforcement of these Heat Illness laws is intensifying, which means employers  can’t afford to ignore them!

These regulations are for the employer’s protection as well as the employees. Enforcement of these Cal/OSHA Heat Illness Laws is intensifying, which means that employers cannot afford to ignore them!

Cal Work Safety understands the Title 8, Section 3395CA Regulations Code

Contact our team of experts….
We know the latest regulations and can help you implement internal programs to keep you compliant and safe from huge penalties.:

Call: 949-533-3742 or email:

DonDressler1@hotmail.com  

Prepare for Hazardous Materials – GHS Compliance Training

13 Jun

Take action now to prepare for your obligation as an employer to train your employees about new rules regarding hazardous chemicals in your work, and the training MUST be done by December 1, 2013.

This obligation applies to virtually every employer in America, unless you only by cleansers, bleaches, detergents, etc. at consumer grocery stores and the like.  If you obtain cleaning products from a commercial supply source, or inks for your printers, solvents, etc. not to mention other chemicals for your work – you are covered by OSHA’s rules regarding Hazardous Materials and Hazardous Communications. 

This OSHA rule, known as” Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals” was adopted to be consistent with the provisions of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), Revision 3. The transmittal of information is to be accomplished by means of comprehensive hazard communication programs, which are to include container labeling and other forms of warning, safety data sheets and employee training.

Under the recently adopted GHS, what have been known as Material Safety Data Sheets, (MSDSs) will change to a new 16-section SDS format. Manufacturers have until June 1, 2015, to comply with the new SDS format. But employers must train all employees on these new Safety Data Sheets and this system by December 1, 2013

OSHA regulations also require employers to have a written hazard communication program which describes how chemical labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets and employee information and training will be met.  Contact us at Don Dressler Consulting, www.DonDressler.com for help.

Fire Safety – Let’s All Learn from West, Texas

21 Apr

fire
The tragic fire and explosion of the fertilizer plant recently in the town of West, Texas should remind all of us of the importance of fire prevention and planning for fire safety. Such fire safety plans are also a requirement of OSHA.
Even if it were nor a compliance issue, it is a real, human issue. A fire department in America responds to a fire, somewhere, every 16 seconds!. Approximately 10,000 employees are injured every year on the job in work related fires. (Not to mention the approximately $4 billion a year in property losses to business from fire).
What does OSHA require:
1. A written plan
2. Identification for your business of the sources of fire hazard including storage of potential ignition sources
3. Some type of alarm system
4. Names and titles of persons responsible for maintaining equipment and systems to prevent and control fire
5. Names and titles of persons responsible for controlling flammable or combustible waste materials
6. Housekeeping procedures to control waste materials
7 Training of employees about fire hazards and what to do in case of emergencies
8. Maintenance plan for equipment and system.
Your own business may need fire extinguishers or other specific control systems, depending on location, facility design, etc.
If you need any help in preparing or updating your fire safety plan, contact your local fire department or email :DonDressler1@hotmail.com

If you need help in preparing

Are You Ready to Prove You Trained Every New Employee in Safety?

23 Dec

Can you produce written proof that every one of your employees has received safety training, particularly new employees? Specifically, can you show:

  1. Employees were given safety training for their job?
  2. The specific training their received?
  3. Who did the training?
  4. When the training occurred?

Personnel Plus Inc. a temporary staffing agency could not produce such records and Cal/OSHA cited them for violating the training documentation requirements of California law.  Cal/OSHA Appeals Board upheld the citation and penalty for violating the Illness & Injury Prevention Plan requirements of CCR 8, Section 3202 (b)(2).

Every California employer – no matter what size – no matter what industry or occupation – must have a written safety plan and provide safety training before any employee starts work.  And, the employer must have written records to prove it. 

If you need help in complying with these rules, e-mail DonDressler1@hotmail.com

Half Way Through the Year – Have You Done Hazard Inspections?

10 Jul

A key to safety and also OSHA compliance is hazard identification and correction.

These are essential elements in California’s written safety plans or Illness and Injury Prevention Plans.

Each company has some choice in how frequeently it conducts hazard inspections, although OSHA regulatons also specifiy that inspections need to occur when new equipment or processes are installed, when hazards are brought to the company’s attention, and some other specific times. But it is good pracice, and almost essential to have somo rregular schedule of safety inspections or hazard inspections as well. So, it’s already July – have you conducted any inspections yer?

If you need help, suggested inspection checklists to use, or advice, just check our new website, www.CalWorkSafety.com or email me at DonDressler1@hotmail.com

How Can You Measure Safety at Your Company?

17 May

There are many ways to measure safety. 

  • Have injuries decreased?
  • Has exposure to potential hazards decreased?
  • Have attitudes changed? This is hard to gauge unless surveys and open discussions are conducted and recorded.
  • Have changes been made to increase safety?

Consider this: Do you feel safe at work? If the answer “no,” then you’ve got your work cut out for you.  If you would like help to improve things, just e-mail DonDressler1@hotmail.com.  I would be happy to send to a FREE Guide to writing your company’s written safety plan, and can offer more help if you need.

With thanks to  Jack Rubinger, jarubinger@graphicproducts.com for the ideas of this article.